Visit to Namoori Escarpment

Whenever Dr. Vince “Tiiya” Waite comes to town, I take him out to Namoori to visit his old friend who is chief of that village. Often we go out to the Gambaga Escarpment just north of there after visiting with the chief and enjoying a meal together. Several of his courtiers guided us and took us to a new spot a bit farther east down the scarp.

There they showed us a natural spring that attracts wildlife year round. In fact, we saw a troop of about 10-12 wild patas monkeys running through the trees below. They also showed me a new path I did not know of that allows one to walk down the cliffs and get to the White Volta River.

It follows the trend that each village seems to have its own path down the Gambaga Escarpment to reach their farms, the forest and the river. So far, I’ve seen such paths at Gambaga, Dintigi, Namoori, Zarantinga/Namaasim, Sakogu, Baungu, Kpatiritinga, Nakpanduri and Tusugu.

KJ at Play

Here are some images from the first few months of this year of KJ enjoying life in and around Nalerigu.

Photo Gallery: Women at Work

William contributed some images from Ghana to this IMB.org gallery of women at work. They celebrate the many contributions women are making to society worldwide and illuminate some of the challenges they face. Happy International Women’s Day!

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Snake Skin at the Escarpment

We don’t have too many encounters with snakes around our house – maybe ten in the last four years and only three of them were venomous. I’ve expected to see more in my explorations around the Gambaga Escarpment but, alas, I’ve only seen two – a red-lined snake and a Dorr’s Racer.

On a recent visit to the cliffs, Trey found a three meter long snake skin! It was incredible how big it was – both in length and girth. And the fact that it’s a shed skin means the snake was growing even bigger!

My guess is that it is a python and lives off the rock hyraxes that populate the caves & cracks of the cliffs.

The Ambassador’s Visit

January 28, 2018 was an exciting day in Nalerigu. Mr. Robert Jackson, US Ambassador to Ghana, paid us a visit with his wife and an entourage of embassy representatives. Among them was Mr. Jimmy Mauldin and his wife, both former missionaries at the Baptist Medical Centre. Jimmy served as the BMC Administrator for several years in the 90s. He is now the Economic Adviser to the Ambassador in Ghana.

Ambassador Jackson first received a tour of our hospital led by Dr. Tim Cahill and Mr. Stephen Yiddi. After which we had a meal together at the BMC guesthouse. All the American citizens living in East Mamprusi District were invited (my family, the Cahills and Rachel, a PeaceCorps volunteer in Jawani).

The visit concluded with a visit to the NaYiri in town. I was very proud of the wonderful welcome that Nalerigu’s paramount chief, elders and subchiefs gave our Ambassador. He too was very impressed and promised to continue to USAid’s efforts to assist the people of the Northern Region, specifically mentioning CHPS and indoor mosquito spraying.

The NaYiri gave the Ambassador an honorary title of Sumniraana or “Chief of Good Relations.” Ambassador Jackson graciously accepted and responded to the lunsi‘s call to dance Damba (watch their video clip on Facebook).

Vacation in France (lots of photos!)

After Spain, we took a train to the Languedoc-Roussillon coastal region of France to visit our friends the Darriets. You may remember that last summer William officiated their eldest son’s wedding. The Darriet family were the BEST hosts and took us to all sorts of cool places in their incredibly beautiful and historic region!

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