Animal Names in Mampruli Medical Terminology

We often forget that the fancy medical terms we use in English usually have their roots in Latin and Greek and are actually just simple descriptors. Epilepsy is a classic example coming from the Greek epilēpsia, which is comprised of epi ‘upon’ + lambanein ‘take hold of’.

Mampruli also does that with several sicknesses. For example, stomach issues are described as pukpeeŋŋu  – literally, “hard stomach” – and malaria is called dunsidooru or “mosquito sickness.”

There are also several diseases that are simply named after creatures believed to either cause the illness or that reflect the disease’s symptoms. In traditional African medicine, the preventative and/or curative measures can also be influenced by the animal namesake of the sickness. Read More

“Dr. Haun” by Dr. Melinda Roney

Syndactyly Repair with Dr. Taylor

When plastic surgeon Dr. Taylor comes to BMC as a Samaritan’s Purse medical volunteer, he is always met with interesting cases and puzzles to solve. This young girl was born with syndactyly of both hands. Sometimes, syndactyly only affects two fingers or toes that are fused together. This little one, however, had fusion of all the fingers. Dr. Taylor was able to separate the thumb from the rest of the fingers on both hands.

The wounds were healed nicely and the patient was finally able to grasp things in a claw like fashion with an opposable thumb. That simple ability will make a huge difference in this young girl’s life. She can now pick things up with each hand and will even be able to learn to write.

Fasciotomy to Save a Limb with Compartment Syndrome

In December, I operated on a little girl’s forearm. She had developed compartment syndrome after falling and injuring her arm. The child’s family assumed she had broken her arm and brought her to the bonesetter who wrapped the arm tightly.  After 2 days, it became apparent that the child’s arm was severely injured and she was brought to the hospital. The arm was swollen and tense, discolored and numb with no pulses.

The muscles in the arms and legs are encased in thick connective tissue compartments (called fascia).  When the muscles become swollen within this compartment, the pressure can compress the nerves, blood vessels and even the muscle itself to the point that the tissue begins to die.

** WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES **

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Visiting Nagboo Patient

Recently, I was able to visit one of my patients in his home, to greet his wife and new baby boy and to pray with them. Over a year ago, I had to amputate his lower leg. He had been shot by armed robbers. The tibia and fibula were shattered and the blood supply to the foot was compromised. The patient first chose to go to the local “bone setter,” and returned only when the foot was already dead. He finally agreed to amputation and healed well afterwards. He was highly motivated to get a prosthesis and did very well with the training. Once he returned from the training center with his new leg, he rode his bike from his village to the hospital (about 3 miles) just to greet me.

When we went to the Baptist church in his village, he saw me and invited me to greet his wife and new baby. The pastor of the church accompanied me and we encouraged him and prayed with them. The best part was when my son asked me which leg was the fake leg!

Situs Inversus Totalis

There are certain conditions that you read about in medical school, think how interesting that it must be, and never expect to see it in real life.

** WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES **

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The Christian Ministry of Healing Where Medicine Is Magic

Heidi contributed an article to IMB.org about the challenges of navigating traditional African religion and superstitions when providing Christ-centered medical care.

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